28

Dec '23

What Is A Domain Name? The Complete Guide – Forbes Advisor Australia – Forbes

The journalists on the editorial team at Forbes Advisor Australia base their research and opinions on objective, independent information-gathering.
When covering investment and personal finance stories, we aim to inform our readers rather than recommend specific financial product or asset classes. While we may highlight certain positives of a financial product or asset class, there is no guarantee that readers will benefit from the product or investment approach and may, in fact, make a loss if they acquire the product or adopt the approach.
To the extent any recommendations or statements of opinion or fact made in a story may constitute financial advice, they constitute general information and not personal financial advice in any form. As such, any recommendations or statements do not take into account the financial circumstances, investment objectives, tax implications, or any specific requirements of readers.
Readers of our stories should not act on any recommendation without first taking appropriate steps to verify the information in the stories consulting their independent financial adviser in order to ascertain whether the recommendation (if any) is appropriate, having regard to their investment objectives, financial situation and particular needs. Providing access to our stories should not be construed as investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell any security or product, or to engage in or refrain from engaging in any transaction by Forbes Advisor Australia. In comparing various financial products and services, we are unable to compare every provider in the market so our rankings do not constitute a comprehensive review of a particular sector. While we do go to great lengths to ensure our ranking criteria matches the concerns of consumers, we cannot guarantee that every relevant feature of a financial product will be reviewed. We make every effort to provide accurate and up-to-date information. However, Forbes Advisor Australia cannot guarantee the accuracy, completeness or timeliness of this website. Forbes Advisor Australia accepts no responsibility to update any person regarding any inaccuracy, omission or change in information in our stories or any other information made available to a person, nor any obligation to furnish the person with any further information.
Published: Oct 13, 2023, 11:39am
Edited By
Edited By
Your domain name is essentially your business storefront—where old and new customers find you. And with a memorable domain name, you can easily stand out from your competition.
But what exactly is a domain name, what types are there and how should you choose one? Also, how can you find a domain name, and how do you register it?
We’ll be answering all of these questions below.
Related: How To Transfer a Domain Name
Featured Partners
1
Namecheap
Starting price
$9 AUD
Renewal cost
$21.94 AUD
Free WHOIS privacy
Yes
2
Bluehost
On Bluehost.com’s Website
Starting price
$19.50 AUD
Renewal cost
$US19.99 ($30 AUD)
Free WHOIS privacy
No
3
HostGator
On HostGator’s Website
Starting price
$US12.95 ($19 AUD)
Renewal cost
$US19.99 ($30 AUD)
Free WHOIS privacy
No
Typically called the web address, a domain name is your website’s unique identifier. It’s what users type in their search bar to reach a website. It’s also the easy-to-remember form of your actual address, which is displayed as a string of numbers that can be challenging to memorise. For example, the domain name for YouTube is youtube.com, unlike its actual address of 142.250.97.93.
Your domain registrar assigns your domain name a unique internet protocol (IP) address, and your web hosting service does the backend work to make your address accessible in a human-friendly manner. Whenever someone enters your domain name in their browser, their device will send a request to the domain name system (DNS). The DNS network then finds the IP addresses associated with that domain name and directs the device to the exact destination or web page.This process takes less than a second.
There are different levels and types of domains you must have seen when browsing the internet.
A top-level domain (TLD) is the segment of a domain name after the site name and dot. It tells you the purpose or location of a business or website.
These are the most common examples of top-level domains:
Other top-level domain examples include .app and .icu.
These top-level domains require approval from relevant agencies. You need to comply with predefined community themes to use them. Examples are:
Currently, there are over 300 country code top-level domains, and the letters indicate specific countries. Examples are:
Country code TLDs tell visitors your target country. For example, Amazon has multiple TLDs, including Amazon.com, Amazon.com.au and Amazon.ca. Also, expect Forbes.com to offer a different experience than Forbes.com.au.
A second-level domain is the string of text before the top-level domain. For instance, “Forbes” is our second-level domain, while “.com” is the top-level domain.
Third-level domains designate the specific servers of a website, such as indicating its store or blog. For example, browsing Wikipedia in North America will direct you to en.wikipedia.org. The “en.” is the third-level domain, indicating that you’re reading the content in English. HubSpot also uses blog.hubspot to direct visitors to its blog content and academy.hubspot to lead users to its learning hub.

People often get these mixed up, but each has its distinct functions. The domain name is part of the uniform resource locator (URL), and it’s the readable address after the “www” of a web address. The URL is the complete address. It has the domain name, the protocol and path for locating your website pages.
For example, this page’s URL is “/”, while “forbes.com” is the domain name. The URL includes the protocol “https” and “//”, which is the path to this page that tells you everything you need to know about a domain name.
Since your domain name is the first thing your website visitors see, you need to ensure it’s the right one. Also, your domain name can affect your brand’s success, website search engine optimization (SEO), keyword rankings and general marketing efforts. As such, you need to consider several factors when choosing a domain name. Here are a few of the major ones.
Your choice of domain name will affect how your customers perceive you. For instance, “.com.au” is the most appropriate for local small businesses; that’s why it’s usually the first option. But when it’s unavailable, .org, .net and any of the ones below are good alternatives, as they’ll convey the essence of your website:
Just make sure whatever domain type you choose is relevant to your website.
For domain names, the shorter, the better. Shorter domain names are easier to remember and faster to type, which helps your audience find you quicker and provides them with a positive user experience (UX).
So:
To be distinct in customers’ eyes, you need a domain name that reflects your brand. Here are a few tricks for a catchy domain name.
Try combining keywords with your brand name so it stands out. But make sure the keyword is relevant. If you sell boats and your brand name is Vista, you can have vista+boats= vistaboats.com.au (if it’s available). At a glance, such a honed domain name will show users what you do and help visitors remember you. It can also improve your site rankings.

Finding a domain name that’s still available can be challenging, but don’t let it deter you. The best domain registrars have domain name generators you can use to check if your desired domain name is available. And if not, they’ll suggest closely related ideas that can work for you.
You can also get a free domain name by choosing website builders such as Wix and IONOS. Otherwise, expect to pay anywhere from $1 to tens of thousands per year, with the average cost of a domain name being $10 to $20 per year. The prices often depend on:

Pro Tip

Check for trademark infringement and make sure your domain name is available

Check for trademark infringement and make sure your domain name is available
Trademark infringements lead to legal suits and domain losses, which cost you legal fees and the need to fix your web presence. So, before registering a domain name, search the Australian trademark search tool to confirm that it’s not already registered.

After settling on a domain name, the next step is to register the name, which is straightforward.
In Australia, the not-for-profit .au Domain Administration (auDA) oversees the management of our country code Top-Level Domain (ccTLD)—the .au domain. AuDA allocates .au domain names to users and the .au extensions are valid for up to five years. You can read more about registering your domain name in our guide.
Featured Partners
1
Namecheap
Starting price
$9 AUD
Renewal cost
$21.94 AUD
Free WHOIS privacy
Yes
2
Bluehost
On Bluehost.com’s Website
Starting price
$19.50 AUD
Renewal cost
$US19.99 ($30 AUD)
Free WHOIS privacy
No
3
HostGator
On HostGator’s Website
Starting price
$US12.95 ($19 AUD)
Renewal cost
$US19.99 ($30 AUD)
Free WHOIS privacy
No
You need a domain name to build your business website. You can also use it to create a business email. Plus, your address would be difficult to remember without a domain name. Otherwise, Forbes.com, for instance, would be 199.232.57.55.
A domain name is a user-friendly web address that allows internet users to access your website. However, your website includes the files, images and any other data visitors interact with when they enter your website address.
You can buy domain names from any of the best domain registrars, including Namecheap, Crazy Domains, Google Domains and HostGator. Choose based on your needs, such as privacy preference, budget or need for ancillary services such as web building and web hosting. For example, GoDaddy AU is known for its low rates for first-time purchasers.
Christiana Jolaoso has reviewed tech gadgets and other business-relevant technological innovations to help businesses and individuals choose the most suitable products. She's featured in U.S News and World Report's 360 Reviews, Insider Business School, and Best Reviews.

source

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Joker
Joker

Joker has been buying and selling domains since the late 90's. He has worked with many portfolios and investors over the past decade as well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *